Grímsá og Tunguá

The Grimsá lies in the Borgarfjörður district, some 100 km north-west of Reykjavik. It is situated on the eastern shore of the Hvitá system and joins that river three kilometres upstream of its estuary at Borgarnes. It is 32 km long and has 66 pools. At the upper end of its valley Grimsá is joined by the rocky, tumbling Tunguá, which is fished as a separate beat.

 

For much of its length Grimsá has a gentle character, as it flows through the gently sloping, grassy valley. At the top of the main river is a large lake, which provides a good supply of water for much of the summer. The Tunguá is a typical highland stream that flows over a rocky bed littered with boulders and has small pools and pots that hold salmon mostly in the latter half of the season. Below the junction of Tunguá and Grimsá is the start of some of the best water on the river. These are the high number pools that flow through a wide valley of rough pasture land. In these stretches Grimsá has cut its way through the turf of the valley floor and formed pools that have steep earth banks on the one side and gently sloping gravel on the other. The current is smooth and gentle for most of the way, punctuated by occasional short stretches of rapids. The river here is from 10 to 20 m wide. The lower third of the river is where Grimsá leaves its home valley and joins the great Borgarfjörður valley, that runs at a right angle from north to south. The river flows along a rock ledge in the valley floor that forms its upper series of waterfalls. The pools in this section of the river are rougher and shorter than those found upstream. Things level off for a kilometre or so before the river descends the first foss up from the river mouth and the site of the Grimsá fishing lodge. The river owners have been very canny below this foss by turning what was once a very wide shallow riffle into several good holding pools. In the spring of each year, after the winter floods, a bulldozer is brought in to push gravel into a high bank on the east side of the river, thus forming a concentrated run of about 15 m wide. The pools from here to the junction with Hvitá hold fish mostly in the early season and sea-trout late in the year.

 

This river is perfect for those who enjoy the light approach to salmon fishing and prefer to use single-hand rods. The riffle-hitch method is very successful throughout the river, and especially on those upper pools where the fish can be seen coming to the fly in the glassy currents. For much of the season small flies from size 14 to 8 are all that are required. A good choice of patterns would be Hairy Mary, Laxa Blue, Silver Blue, Silver Stoat and Black Sheep. Not much wading is necessary on Grimsá, although on the lower half of the river the pools are somewhat wider and getting one's feet wet will be necessary at times.

 

Fishing begins on 22 June and ends on 24 September, after which sea-trout fishing is available for two rods on the lower river in October. The early weeks see fishing contained to the lower river, and especially in those man-made pools below the first foss. The best fishing is usually from the last three weeks of July when the main grilse run is on. The average weight of grilse is around 6 lbs and there are fish up to 20 lbs present. The record salmon at Grimsá is 34 lbs, caught in 1917. Grimsá produces some beautiful sea-trout from late July, which are usually between 2 and 4 lbs and a wonderful bonus to any day’s catch. Catch and release is voluntary on this river, but is widely practised.

 

 

Services at Grimsá includes guiding, which is booked and charged for separately, and full board accommodation with gourmet meals. The lodge provides rods with private en-suite room. The lodge is rather striking and was designed by the well-known American angler Ernest Schwiebert. Fossas is perched on a cliff  next to the lower foss and the dining room provides one of the best river views in Iceland. At ground level is a sauna, and a drying room for waders, coats, etc. and on the first floor are the bedrooms, sitting room and dining room. Outside there is a hot pot that overlooks the waterfall (which is dramatically floodlit in the evenings, after fishing is over of course!). Freezing facilities are available for the catch. Wine and beer is sold at the lodge.


Now the river has been leased to a private enterprice, the Hreggnasi ehf. until the end of the 2014 season.  

For further information, contact:

HREGGNASI - Angling Club

Sudurlandsbraut 18
108 Reykjavik
Iceland

Tel: +354 577 2230

 

Jon Thor Juliusson

Mobile +354 898 2230
E-mail: jon@hreggnasi.is

 

www.hreggnasi.is

Facebook: Hreggnasi Angling Club

 


 

 

Catch statistics for

Date Salmon Trout Rods
Jun. 20208
Jun. 27748
Jul. 41758
Jul. 113018
Jul. 184398
Jul. 255768
Aug. 16378
Aug. 87038
Aug. 157588
Aug. 228148
Aug. 298798
Sep. 59478
Sep. 129868
Sep. 1910368
Sep. 2811288

Total catch per year

Year Salmon Trout
20181128
20171290
2016608
20151399
2014516
20131645
2012481
20111344
20111370
20101961
2009133953
20082225144
20071078180
20061118172
20051486120
20041085343
20031156176
20021116317
20011005298
20001048251
19991872
19981705
19971613
19961484
19951123
19941485
19931228
19921864
19911294
1990756
19891200
19881963
1987825
19861863
19851463
19841061
19831382
1982717
1981845
1980869
19791527
19781952
19771103
19761429
19752116
19741419